-- vRWstbX.gif (27233 bytes)                       (c) 1994 by pat works; Rev. 1998 for Chapter 2 "Ready, Set, SIT!"
A Basic stable Position for Sit Flying ( Vertical RW )

For new sit flyers I suggest a basic-stable foundation-position that I call the VRW-stable position. With the VRW-stable no matter what sort of weird-flailing tumble your attempts at vertical flight produce, you can quickly recover and dance on. More joy; less floundering.

A foundation body position provides a secure-feeling reference point for better skydiving. The skydivers basic stable position is important. Most of us agree that the basic stable freefall position enabled the skydiving and mutual air-frolic we enjoy today. The original stable freefall parachutist’s positions came from France in the 1950s. In the USA Russ Gunby called them the "basic stable" and the "French Frog" in his 1960 book Sport Parachuting. Today when thinking of "falling stable" we have those as a reference and Guy Manos’ 1981? "boxman") or , perhaps my 1971 "RW stable position"

Recently, the euphoria called Vertical Relative Work has engendered new "Vertical Basic Stable Positions". A part of what I call progressive RW, these new positions are components of: Chute-assis, Free flying, Free Style and Sky Dance. As pioneers Cloud Dancer, McZen and Zipser probably have noted, the basic positions from which most vertical RW movements begin and end include:

1. The sit-position "easy-boy" chute-assis(laid-back: as in a recliner chair -- "freak-brother-flying" 1974?) [the kitchen-chair or a plie-position, is rather more difficult; thus less "basic"]

2. The basic standup, legs together (Wog, about 1977?). [standup legs apart is harder to do: in ballet: the second position]

3. The Olav (Zipser) 1991 (inverted with legs spread in "parade-rest" : an inverted straddle or ballet second position)

and now --- (ta-Da!) :-> The "vRW-stable" (1994) [explained below]

 

New Foundation Position for progressive skydiving

A fundamental foundation-position for Vertical RW

For many new VRWers, those first three basic positions from which most vertical RW movements begin and in which they terminate now have an even more fundamental foundation-position. I call it the VRW-stable position. With the VRW-stable no matter what sort of weird-flailing tumble your attempts at vertical flight produce, you can quickly recover and dance on. More joy; less floundering.

 

When does one take the VRW stable position?

Take the VRW stable for a solid position which easily transfers to a standup, sit, or Olav-invert... anything. Next time your attempted sit-stand-invert-RW-freefly trick flops and you endeavor to recover, try the VRW stable. In addition, use the VRW stable when doing any sort of exit from any type of aircraft. It even seems to work for those scary inverted flat-spins some newbee-sit flyers unintentionally perform.

 

So, just How does one take the VRW stable position?

To experience this effective position on the ground follow this recipe: Find a deserted room. Wear normal clothes. Try not to giggle, drool, or make grunting sounds.

          a. Put your feet together.

          b. Squat down so that only your toes are touching the ground. Think of a mixture between "hunkering-down" and a style-tuck.

          c. Spread out your arms in the "jesus-position" and,

          d. Bingo! ya did it. Easy Huh? Works, too. Try it. |-)

For added drama, if "normal" people should blunder into your practice session room whilst you are in the position, do this: look quickly from side to side while making eagle-like shrieks. Flap your arms. Still squatting, purposefully hop-flap-shriek towards the nearest window and gracefully dive through it. ( Be careful to land softly.) ;-p

 

Swim & sail examples

In the vRW stable your spine is curved in the shape of a C. For example, think of swimming. Have you ever jumped into a swimming pool and done a "cannon-ball" to splash everybody? You know, you jump up, curl into a ball, hug your knees, and Splash! YaHoo! Well, for the vRW Stable do the same thing. But, leave your arms out in the jesus-position. It is a cannonball with the arms-out that keeps you flight-ready. In other words, the vRW stable works like a keel on a sailboat. The bottom half of the "C" is your butt-and-legs: [keel and ballast]; The top-half is your arms [the sail].

Whenever you go into this position, however your body is oriented, your heavy keel-ass will be down and your sail-arms up. Also, the vRW Stable gets your dumb legs out of the picture. Since the legs are frequently not well aquatinted with the brain, and often act like a propeller, getting them out of the way allows Mother Earth and sister Gravity to do their thing, unobstructed.

So do the vRW stable today and keep Flail and Spin away!

                E-mail me if you like this!

Rev. 09/23/98

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